GI Kaposi Sarcoma – 8/20/18

Thanks to Wendy for presenting a case of an elderly man with h/o remote renal transplant presenting with chronic progressive DOE, lower extremity edema, and upper and lower GI bleed, found to have AIDS-related GI kaposi sarcoma and associated protein-losing enteropathy!


Clinical Pearls:

  • Keep a broad differential for patients on immunosuppression
  • Incidence of KS is higher with CD4 counts <200 but it can be seen in CD4>500 as well.
  • Prognosis is generally good with treatment.  Poorer prognosis is associated with visceral involvement (as opposed to cutaneous), multiple opportunistic infections, and CD4<200
  • Mainstay of therapy is anti-retrovirals.  Chemotherapy can be used for ARV unresponsive disease, significant edema, extensive organ involvement, or IRIS.  Studies on chemo + ARV vs ARV alone showed no survival benefit with the former.
  • Thanks to Dr. Szumowski for the clinical pearl on use of sirolimus in renal transplant recipients with KS (article here).

Differential for odynophagia:

  • Infectious
    • HSV
    • CMV
    • Fungal
      • Candida ⇒ risk factors include dentures, immunosuppression (AIDS, chemo), radiation to head and neck, recent antibiotics
      • Others: crypto, histo, blasto, aspergillus
    • Mycobacteria
  • Medication-induced
  • Less common
    • Reflux esophagitis
    • Crohn’s

Kaposi Sarcoma:

  • Vascular tumor associated with HHV-8
  • Four different epidemiologic forms:
    1. AIDS-related: most common type in US
      • Higher incidence with CD4 <200 but can be seen with CD4 >500 as well.
    2. Endemic/African
    3. Organ transplant-associated (higher incidence after solid organ transplant)
    4. Classic (indolent cutaneous proliferative disease in older men of Mediterranean or Jewish descent)

KS in the GI tract:

  • Can occur in the absence of cutaneous disease
  • Symptoms range from asymptomatic to weight loss, abdominal pain, n/v, UGIB/LGIB, malabsorption, diarrhea
  • Inflammatory cytokine syndrome:
    • Systemic inflammation in AIDS-related KS
    • Symptoms:
      • Fever
      • Edema
      • Neuropathy
      • GI/respiratory symptoms
      • Hypoalbuminemia (can occur in the absence of the who syndrome)
        • Secondary to protein losing enteropathy (check stool clearance of alpha-1 antitrypsin)
      • Thrombocytopenia
      • Splenomegaly
Staging of KS: 
  • Extent of tumor (T): limited to skin with minimal oral cavity involvement is good.  Visceral involvement has poor prognosis.
  • Immune status (I): Degree of immunosuppression from HIV. CD4 <200 has worse prognosis
  • Severity of systemic illness (S): poor prognosis a/w h/o OI, thrush, B symptoms, etc.
  • Endoscopy and bronchoscopy are only done if initial stool test and CXR are abnormal
Treatment:
  • Goal: palliation, prevention of disease progression, and shrinkage of tumor to alleviate edema, organ compromise, and psychological distress
  • Systemic
    • Treatment with potent ART
      • IRIS can occur within 3-6 weeks of initiation
    • Chemo: for patients with advanced KS and rapid progression
      • Indications
        • >25 lesions
        • Unresponsive to local treatment or ART alone
        • Extensive edema
        • Symptomatic visceral involvement
        • IRIS
      • Agents:
        • Pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or daunorubicin
        • Paclitaxel, bleo, vinblastine, vincristine, etoposide
    • Chemo + ART or ART alone? While response rates are higher with the former, no survival benefit
  • Local symptomatic therapy
    • Intralesional chemo (vinblastine)
    • Radiation therapy
    • Topical alitretinoin

 

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